Welcome to the SEAM Management Committee Community!

On 14 February 2007, the SEG Advanced Modeling (SEAM) Corporation was incorporated as a not-for-profit organization in the state of Oklahoma, with SEG as sole member, for the purpose of fiduciary, policy, and management oversight of the SEAM projects ("Phases"). SEAM is an industrial consortia dedicated to large-scale leading-edge geophysical numerical modeling.

The SEAM projects will provide the geophysical exploration community with geophysical model data for subsurface geological models at a level of complexity and size that cannot be practicably computed by any single company or small number of companies. A general introduction to the SEAM initiative can be found in TLE's June 2007 issue.

The SEAM mission is to advance the science and technology of applied geophysics through a cooperative industry effort focused on subsurface model construction and generation of synthetic data sets for geophysical problems of importance to the resource extraction industry. Data sets, after an initial two years of confidentiality, will enter the public domain.

The primary goals of SEAM are to: 

  • and generate synthetic design model 3D and 2D seismic data
  • share the high cost effort of substantial model design and generation
  • provide a forum to discuss geophysical problems of interest
  • advance the art of modeling and computation
  • provide data sets for industry benchmarks and educational purposes

 

 

SEAM Phase II Project

Land Seismic – The Challenges

SEAM has chosen land seismic challenges as the focus for Phase II after discussion with industry on several potential projects. This focus appears to offer the greatest potential for a multi-company collaborative effort to facilitate technological break-throughs. Key enablers that warrant the focus on land challenges are the trend to increasingly high channel counts, continued advances in high-performance computing, increasingly sophisticated interpretation tools that demand properly conditioned data and the coming-of-age of multi-component recording.

Land seismic activity is on the increase around the world. The Middle East and North African areas continue to be the domain of highly sophisticated 3D acquisition programs. Chinese growth has increased E&P activity for ever more subtle stratigraphic targets in the interior basins. Recent developments in Iraq presage a wave of high-defi nition 3D surveys, setting the base for 4D efforts to come. The emerging shale resource plays in North America and Europe are driving increased acquisition activity.

SEAM facilitated industry discussions during 2009 and 2010 have identified three core challenge themes that Phase II should focus on:

■ High density and areal extensive acquisition geometries

■ Near surface complexities

■ Fractured reservoir characterization

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land Seismic – The Challenges

SEAM has chosen land seismic challenges as the focus for Phase II after discussion with industry on several potential projects. This focus appears to offer the greatest potential for a multi-company collaborative effort to facilitate technological break-throughs. Key enablers that warrant the focus on land challenges are the trend to increasingly high channel counts, continued advances in high-performance

computing, increasingly sophisticated interpretation tools that demand properly conditioned data and the coming-of-age of multi-component recording.

 

Land seismic activity is on the increase around the world. The Middle East and North African areas continue to be the domain of highly sophisticated 3D acquisition programs. Chinese growth has increased E&P activity for ever more subtle stratigraphic targets in the interior basins. Recent developments in Iraq presage a wave of high-defi nition 3D surveys, setting the base for 4D efforts to come. The emerging shale resource plays in North America and Europe are driving increased acquisition activity.

 

SEAM facilitated industry discussions during 2009 and 2010 have identified three core challenge themes that Phase II should focus on:

 

■ High density and areal extensive acquisition geometries

■ Near surface complexities

■ Fractured reservoir characterization